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THE DENTAL CARE SERIES
By Jan Bellows D.V.M. DipAVDC
All Pets Dental Clinic

Welcome to the Dental Care Series!

By the time most owners recognize oral disease in their pets, the problem is chronic and progressive. Dr. Jan Bellows, a board-certified veterinary dental specialist from Florida, has compiled a comprehensive series of articles that will help any pet owner better understand and subsequently take better care of their pets' oral health.

What would happen if you stopped brushing your own teeth? Even if you only ate hard food as most dogs do, there still would be problems. You should be brushing your dog's teeth twice daily if you can manage it. It's not as difficult as you might imagine.
Feline dental pathology and care are perhaps the most overlooked and under-treated areas in small animal medicine.
Dr. Jan Bellows is a board-certified veterinary dentist. His office, Hometown Animal Hospital and Dental Clinic, is located at 17100 Royal Palm Boulevard in Weston, Florida. He can be reached for consultations at 954-349-5800.
FGS is a severe oral disease that affects some cats where the body becomes allergic to plaque around the teeth.
Some dogs and cats develop growths in their mouths. Similar to humans, these growths may be benign or malignant. Once a mass is noticed, analysis must be made to determine the cause of the growth.
Periodontal disease is inflammation of some or all of a tooth's support. When compared to gingivitis, periodontitis indicates bone loss. If left untreated, periodontitis may cause loose painful teeth as well as internal disease. Periodontal disease is caused by plaque (bacteria).
Why should I brush my dog's or cat's teeth?
Cats can be affected by inflammation of the entire mouth called stomatitis or lymphocytic plasmacytic syndrome (LPS).
A common feline oral malady is the feline oral resorptive lesion (FORL).
Ferret dental problems are similar to dog and cat conditions. Fractured teeth occur commonly. Ferrets even suffer from some orthodontic conditions.
Halitosis, also called bad breath, is as an offensive odor emanating from the oral cavity. Bad breath is a common presenting pet odor complaint. Causes may be commonly be related to the mouth or rarely related to other health problems.
More than 85% of dogs and cats older than 4 years have periodontal pathology.
Just as you would want to cure a painful skin condition or sore joint in your pet, you should also consider relieving pain in your pet's mouth. When an oral problem is caused by poorly aligned teeth, orthodontic treatment may be needed.
Root canals, dental x-rays, orthodontics, crowns, caps, implants, and periodontal surgery for pets? You must be kidding? Not at all. Dental procedures are routinely performed in veterinary practices daily. How does a loving pet owner know if dental care is needed and where can a pet owner go for advanced dental care.
It is easy to recognize if your cat has a broken leg, but how about a broken tooth? You would think pets would stop eating when they had oral problems. Unfortunately, this is not usually the case. By the time most owners recognize oral disease in their pets, the problem is chronic and progressive.

   
About the author(s)
Jan Bellows DVM, ACVD, ABVP Dr. Jan Bellows is one of 114 board certified veterinary dentists in the country. He is also a diplomate of the American Board of Veterinary Practitioners, an organization that certifies veterinarians who excel in clinical medicine and surgery. His practice, Hometown Animal Hospital and All Pets Dental Clinic is located in Weston, Florida. In addition to his general veterinary practice, Dr. Bellows repairs broken teeth, performs root canals and treats periodontal disease in dogs, cats, rabbits, and ferrets.<BR><BR> Dr. Bellows grew up in New York, attended the University of Florida for undergraduate training and Auburn University for his veterinary degree. He completed a medicine and surgery internship at the Animal Medical Center in New York City. For fun Dr. Bellows runs marathons and has completed 72 so far.


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